The Frog Is Still A Frog – Even After The Kiss

Back in the early 1980′s when I was more of a Cappuccino Princess than a Cappuccino Queen, I remember watching fairy tales on VHS tapes (yes, I am that old).  My parents would bring home a new fairy tale on what seemed like a weekly basis.  I would watch stories about pretty Princess’ turning frogs into Prince’s with a kiss, Prince’s bringing back Princess’ from the death curse of an apple, and beastly creatures who were really good on the inside –  if only the right woman came around to turn them into a handsome Prince.

As a parent, you might not think your child really believes this stuff.  I was a believer, and if your child is anything like I was – she believes it too.  I remember being five years old, looking at a frog, and actually wondering if that frog was really a Prince waiting to be kissed.  As I grew older, of course I knew they were all just fairy tales; however, some of the lessons and the hope from those stories still remained.  I believed that there was good in everyone, and was determined to find the good in even the beastly, dirty frog.

 

When I grew up, I found a frog.  He presented himself as charming frog, he tried to clean up well, and even said many of the right things; however, he was still just a frog.  When I started to see poor behavior from the frog, I said to myself, ‘he is really good inside – he must be because everyone is good deep down.’  It took me a little over a year to realize that this frog wasn’t turning into a Prince – this frog would stay a dirty, nasty, and evil little slippery frog…even after I kissed him.

 

 

How Psychopaths Use Fairy Tales:

When I met Luc, he made a point to tell me I was the first person he felt so strongly about that he wanted to spend the rest of his life with me.  When he proposed, he told me it was the first time he had proposed.  I later learned that I was at least the third girl who had been told that same story.  (One of the three of us didn’t survive the relationship)  Why did he tell me that?  He told me that because he wanted me to believe that I was the woman who would turn him from the beast into the “good guy”.

 

About eight months into the relationship, just after I found out I was pregnant with my son, Luc described a scenario where he had treated the woman before me horribly.  After listening to the story, I was scared.  I wondered how this man, whom I had wanted to believe was good deep down, could have treated someone that way.  He tried to explain that it was the woman who was abusive toward him, and that was why he didn’t respect her.  (Of course, always someone else’s fault)  His son was sitting in the back seat of the car during this conversation.  After listening to his father talk about treating this woman poorly, his son said, “would you do the same thing to Hera that you did to her?”  Luc began to yell at his son saying, “How could you say that!?  Of course not!”  His son said that to his father because he had seen it happen over and over again.  He knew it would eventually also happen to me.

 

 

You Had A Child With The Beast – Now What?

I had no delusions that keeping Prince safe would be easy, and I knew raising him to be that good man I knew he could be would be met with challenges (because his father was a beast).  Recently, a mother asked me my advice about how she should handle the fact that her son was being conned by his father.  This is a great question and one I gave a lot of thought to when I was planning for Prince to live a long and happy life.  On one hand, one of the best case scenarios would be for the psychopath to show your child the “good side” and attempt to make him believe he is good (as the alternative is evil abuser).  That being said, every protective mother knows that this facade cannot last.  It is a normal concern to worry about the day when the mask drops and your child is devistated, or worse – injured or killed.

I don’t have all the answers and, sadly, Prince didn’t live long enough for me to have to shield him from the lies of his con man father.  What I believed I would do, however, is never lie to my son.  I would always tell my son the truth even if that meant exposing his father’s lies.  For example, I imagined my son would come home telling me about how his father was going to be opening for a major musician in a concert.  Then, he would likely have asked me if I remembered a time when I saw his father in concert.  At this point, I would say to my son, “I have never seen your father in concert.  To my knowledge, he has never been the opening act for any major artists.  I am not sure why he would tell you that, but if you would like to go see him in concert – I will buy tickets and you can surprise him.”  I would never have made excuses for Luc’s poor behavior and I would never allow Prince to believe something that wasn’t true – especially if he asked for my verification of the truth.

 

 

Lessons for my children:

 

I am not suggesting taking the magic out of childhood.  By all means, I will tell my children about Santa Claus and encourage them to put their teeth under their pillow for the tooth fairy.  I will, however, make sure my children have the best chance in life, and grow up understanding that not all people are good people and that people don’t just change because you love them  or because you “kiss them”.  We will watch fairy tales together and we will talk about the real lessons in life.  I will tell my daughter to watch how the man (or frog) treats his mother, sisters, and previous girlfriends.  If he is slimy and terrible to those women, he will do the same thing to you.

Prince was only 15 months when he died.  While I did a lot of talking to him, I never got the chance to teach him life’s lessons.  If I had, I would have told him not to be a frog – but to be a true Prince.  I would have explained to him how important it is to just be a good guy – no scamming, conning, or cheating – just a good guy.  If he was a good guy, he would find his princess.

 

The other day I went to see the movie “Oz the Great and Powerful”.  There was a five year old little girl sitting behind me with her mother.  For those of you who haven’t seen the movie, the bottom line is that Oz is a con man through and through. At a point in the movie, the little girl yelled out, “I told you Mama!  I told you Oz was really a good guy!”  For the little girl, her faith in humanity was restored through another fairy tale.  For Cappuccino Queen, it was another example of a little girl who was being “set up” to believe that one day she would have the power to make a bad man into a good one.

 

Comments

  1. Good Advice and Lessons Learned!!

  2. As usual an amazing post, I honestly believe that Prince would have been a real Prince, his father is a beast BUT he had you as a Mama. Rest in Eternal peace Prince xoxo

  3. I’ve thought about the same things in regards to fairy tale scenarios recently. I keep waiting on the prince to rescue me. I’m learning that I have to rescue myself — there is no prince coming to rescue me. It’s amazing how much fairy tales and romance cloud our views as little girls and how we grow up w/those same views in the back of our minds.

  4. Christine says:

    Great post and wonderful insights, Hera! Those fairy tales that so many children grow up with set them up to be lied to, tricked, and manipulated, and worse, taken by a con man. I have never let my children watch fairy tales because I didn’t want my girls to think that their self worth is measured by whether or not they are chosen by a “Prince” one day, or that they need a man to be happy in life. These are wrong messages that fairy tales give to little girls. But your insight into how these fairy tales perpetuate the idea that there is “good in everyone” and that our “kiss” or love/acceptance can turn a “beast” into a prince is something that never occurred to me. Thanks for sharing that. I am going to talk to my girls about this. Our girls need to know that there are beasts out there and that the beasts can be smooth talkers, romantic, and Prince like in appearance, but that a beast is a beast is a beast. Our love will not change them.

    • cappuccinoqueen says:

      Yes, I know I kept thinking that if only I loved him enough he would love me back. I hadn’t considered that some people are not capable of loving anyone so it really doesn’t matter how you feel about them – you will be treated the same in the end.

      • Christine says:

        Yes, I did too. I didn’t really think I could ever love him romantically because it was so soon after the wedding that I found out who he really was which repulsed me, but my Christian faith has taught me to love our enemies, pray for them, forgive them; and I tried that for 12 years. Finally I came to understand that we are to forgive those who repent, just as the Lord forgives us after we repent. And we are to love our enemies, but that doesn’t mean we have to live with them and allow ourselves to be abused by them. And we can pray from a distance. Preferably a very safe distance. Truthfully, I no longer pray for him because I think he’s a reprobate and even the Bible says that there is no turning back for the reprobate mind. Their consciences have been seared. (I think the biblical term for psychopath/sociopath is reprobate).

  5. God sent you your real Prince. Not only his he your Prince but your savior. Everything, including his untimely death is a part of the big plan God has. Trust and believe that Prince is very much alive!

  6. Great Auntie Elva says:

    Many blessings to you and your family. A frog is a frog is a frog but this frog didn’t turned into a prince. But where he is at I hope he will be there forever and he will be the first frog to turn into a princess.

  7. @Great Auntie Elva, I love your post, the first time i’ve been able to laugh about anyrhing posted. Not only will he turn into a princess, his useless life will be in danger.

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